Tag Archives: toxins

Times of India: Water in SIPCOT 130 Times Toxic Limit

Sep 18 2014 : The Times of India (Chennai)
Water in Sipcot 130 times toxic limit
Bosco Dominique
Cuddalore:
In Cuddalore, High Lead, Cadmium
The groundwater in and around the State Industries Promotion Corporation of Tamil Nadu (Sipcot) in Cuddalore contains carcinogenic chemicals and is unfit for human consumption, according to an analysis by the Sipcot Area Community Environmental Monitors (Sacem).Many of the main parameters were found to be higher than permissible levels, including total dissolved solids (TDS), total hardness, pH, turbidity, magnesium, calcium, sulphates and chlorides as prescribed by the Bureau of Indian Standards. Tamil Na du Pollution Control Board (TNPCB) analysed samples from 11 locations, including two outside the Sipcot complex between February 2013 and April 2014.Sacem found samples had major toxin levels much higher than permissible limits and that the water was unfit for consumption. It released the analysis on September 17 at Cuddalore. Continue reading Times of India: Water in SIPCOT 130 Times Toxic Limit
Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Chinese workers lose their lives producing goods for America

BY LORETTA TOFANI, SPECIAL TO THE SALT LAKE TRIBUNE
charbroil.jpg
“Keepers of the Flame”. Picture from Char Broil website.
Original story and slideshow in the Utah Salt Lake Tribune

GUANGZHOU, China — The patients arrive every day in Chinese hospitals with disabling and fatal diseases, acquired while making products for America.
Continue reading Chinese workers lose their lives producing goods for America

Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Seven deaths in 4 months, do safety codes at chemical units here stink?

Express News Service, November 13, 2006
BHARUCH-ANKLESHWAR: WITH DEATH OF 3 GIRLS AT CLOSED UNIT, POSERS ON SAFEGUARDS CROP UP
Vadodara, November 13: SIX deaths have taken place within four months in two separate incidents of industrial accidents in Ankleshwar’s GIDC unit, while there has been one fatality at the Panoli industrial unit in the neighbourhood which has a high concentration of chemical industries. While authorities made no breakthrough in the mysterious deaths of three girls on Sunday in a closed chemical unit at the Ankleshwar GIDC, they have sought the services of health officials to ascertain if it could be a case of food poisoning.
A month ago, two women and one man had died in an explosion at a unit after release of chemicals in the main effluent drainage pipeline.
These were casual labourers residing in the GIDC area next to Pragna Chemicals in the Ankleshwar GIDC area. According to Gujarat Pollution Control Board (GPCB) officials, some unit had released untreated chemical waste in the effluent drainage which led to a reaction and thereafter an explosion in the nearby tank.
In another such incident around four months ago, a chemical factory worker, Rajendra Bachhansingh, succumbed to severe injuries due to gas leakage at Pesticides India in the Panoli GIDC region. Sources said that such incidences are more frequent at pesticide units than other industries due to a chemical reaction-prone environment.
There are around 1,200 chemicals units in the Bharuch-Ankleshwar region.
In Sunday’s incident where three girls—Kamliben Garvala (18), Kasmi (17), and Anu (7)—died in mysterious circumstances in a closed chemical unit, the Bharuch police have now sought the help of health officials to ascertain if they could have died of food poisoning.
While awaiting the post-mortem and forensic laboratory reports, investigating officer Vijay Soma said, ‘‘We have started recording the statements of everyone in the neighbourhood to know if they experienced any effects of gas emission, but no one seems to confirm it.’’
In addition to GPCB officials, Industrial Safety and Health Department deputy director P J Gamit said, ‘‘We did not find any evidence of gas leakage there. In recent times, we have imposed strict laws for industrial safety in the region.’’
Meanwhile, if the cause of death in Sunday’s incident is not ascertained, the girls’ family will not get the compensation amount they are entitled to under provision of industrial safety laws.
Bharuch district collector Murli Krishna said for the moment they are not considering any compensation, as the cause of death is yet to be established, and also the unit was closed.

Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Investigative Report: Flavoring agent destroys lungs

CHRIS BOWMAN, SACRAMENTO BEE, JULY 30, 2006
283150-0730lungs01.jpg
By the time Irma Ortiz discovered she had been breathing toxic fumes on her job as a mixer at Carmi Flavors near Los Angeles, she had lost at least 70 percent of her lung capacity. Ortiz, 44, a nonsmoker who used to lift 50-pound bags routinely, now finds walking so difficult she spends most of her time indoors. Sacramento Bee/Hector Amezcua
LOS ANGELES — Hacking and gasping, Irma Ortiz could cart her groceries only so far before she’d catch other shoppers glaring at her.
Mortified, she’d abandon her cart on the spot and bolt for the door.
Frank Herrera could gun his dirt bike only so far before choking on the rush of air. Go. Stop. Go. Stop. Exasperated, he gave up riding.
Ortiz, 44, and Herrera, 34, are odd candidates for lung transplants, being nonsmokers and having considerable youth on their side.
How they lost 70 to 80 percent of their breathing capacity is no less astonishing. They acquired the same rare, lung-ravaging disease from breathing the same chemicals on the same type of job.
The two weren’t working in a chemical or pesticide plant. Nor in a weapons plant. They didn’t metal-plate, fumigate, degrease, demolish, smelt or weld.

Continue reading Investigative Report: Flavoring agent destroys lungs

Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail

People breathing poison in Cuddalore

For the first time in India the air that people living near industries breathe has been tested for toxic gases. The results confirm local people’s worst fears, say Sipcot Community Health Monitors, who carried out the study under the direction of Denny Larson of Global Community Monitor.

“In nine years I have seen at least 500 results from different places around the world,” says Larson. “SIPCOT, Cuddalore has to be the worst place to breathe, and certainly the worst that I have seen in terms of the kinds and levels of toxic gases in the air. The levels of some of the chemicals are at least 1000 times higher than what we saw in other developing countries like South Africa, Thailand and the Philippines.”

Said Shweta Narayan, coordinator of the Community Environmental Monitoring program, “Children, foetuses and pregnant women are most at risk of exposure. These chemicals can attack children at a very vulnerable stage of development and may, in cases, permanently damage their ability to fight diseases or their mental, physical and sexual development.”

New Report: SIPCOT, Cuddalore, A Global Toxic Hotspot for Air Pollution Toxic Air Monitoring a First for India – Using Community Monitors, Simple Buckets – Download the report here.

CUDDALORE, 17 September, 2004 — Samples of air that SIPCOT residents breathe were found to contain extremely high levels of at least 22 toxic chemicals, including 8 cancer-causing chemicals, according to a first of a kind report released by SIPCOT Area Community Environmental Monitors. Based on the results, the group has declared SIPCOT, Cuddalore a “Global Toxic Hotspot.” For the first time in India, the air that people living near industries breathe has been tested for toxic gases, such as Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) and sulphur compounds. The results of five samples taken outside Shasun, Tagros, CUSECS 5 and Asian Paints confirm the worst fears of the villagers that the frequent odour incidents they experience are indicators of chemical pollution from the factories. At least 13 chemicals found are used as raw material in SIPCOT industries.

The report justifies the SIPCOT villagers’ demands for continuous air monitoring, including for toxic gases, an aggressive air pollution elimination program, long-term health monitoring, specialised health care facilities for SIPCOT residents, and a ban on the setting up or expansion of any polluting facility in SIPCOT.

The report titled “Gas Trouble: Air Quality in SIPCOT, Cuddalore” was compiled using samples taken by Community Environmental Monitors from Semmankuppam, Sangolikuppam and Eachangadu villages. The monitors are specially trained in the use of the “Bucket” to take air samples, and in monitoring, reporting and acting on pollution or occupational injury incidents. The training in “Bucket” technology was conducted in March 2004 by Denny Larson of Global Community Monitor. Larson is one of the key persons involved in developing and testing the bucket.

“The Bucket results confirm that SIPCOT is a slow-motion Bhopal. For years, the Pollution Control Board and the Tamilnadu Government have ignored our complaints about nasty odours and our health problems,” said S. Ramanathan, a Community Environmental Monitor from Semmankuppam village. “If the Government fails to do anything even after finding out that the air we breathe has chemicals like benzene, carbon tetrachloride and chloroform, they will be telling the world that they don’t care if we live or die as long as the industries can operate profitably.”

At least 14 of the 22 chemicals, including trichloroethene, carbon tetrachloride, acrolein, methylene chloride and hydrogen sulphide, violate the US Environmental Protection Agency’s safety levels. 1,2-dichloroethane, a cancer-causing chemical that was found in an air sample taken downwind of Tagros Chemicals, exceeded safety levels by a factor of 22,973. Levels of hydrogen sulphide, a gas that smells of rotten eggs, in the air sample taken downwind of CUSECS Pump House No. 5 was 874 times the US EPA safety level.

“I have worked nine years with the bucket and seen at least 500 results from different places around the world. SIPCOT, Cuddalore has to be the worst place to breathe, and certainly the worst that I have seen in terms of the kinds and levels of toxic gases in the air,” said Larson. “The levels of some of the chemicals are at least 1000 times higher than what we saw in other developing countries like South Africa, Thailand and the Philippines.”

Despite the magnitude of the problem, not a single health study has been conducted till date in SIPCOT, Cuddalore. The Pollution Control Board does not monitor for toxic gases in the industrial estate, and what basic data it has on air pollution has never been released to public.

The findings of the report have very troubling implications particularly for women, children and old people who spend all their time within the polluted confines of SIPCOT.

“Children, foetuses and pregnant women are most at risk of exposure. These chemicals can attack children at a very vulnerable stage of development and may, in cases, permanently damage their ability to fight diseases or their mental, physical and sexual development,” said Shweta Narayan, coordinator of the Community Environmental Monitoring program.

Despite the demonstrated lack of capacity of the Pollution Control Board or the Health Department to understand the pollution problem and take action to protect public health, the Government is adding to the pollution load in SIPCOT by allowing more polluting units to come up.

Villagers from Semmankuppam and Sangolikuppam are very unhappy about the setting up of a new company, Pandian Chemicals, in SIPCOT Phase II. The company plans to manufacture 38 tonnes/month of Ammonium Perchlorate, a highly explosive chemical used in rocket fuel. The chemical is a problematic groundwater contaminant that is dangerous even at low levels to foetuses, young children and pregnant women. It can be passed on from mother to child through breast milk, and is known to attack the brain development of the child.

“The people don’t want Pandian Chemicals; the Panchayat doesn’t want it. The company manufactures a deadly explosive, and a chemical that is known to affect children’s health. If the Government cares for people, the project should be dropped. Only clean industries that can provide safe jobs to villagers should be allowed in SIPCOT,” said M. Nizamudeen of FEDCOT.

SIPCOT Area Community Environmental Monitoring is a project of FEDCOT, Cuddalore District Consumer Organisation, Global Community Monitor and The Other Media.

Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail